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‘I was just sittin’ here enjoyin’ the company. Plants got a lot to say, if you take the time to listen.’ Eeyore.

30 Jan

garden-clip-art-855110Yesterday, as we were coming back from our afternoon walk, I noticed one of my neighbours pottering around his front garden.  He seemed to be chatting happily away to someone out of my line of sight.  As I got closer I realised there was actually no-one else around.  Perhaps he was talking to a cat hiding in the bushes?  Or perhaps he had seen me first and just assumed I could hear him from where I was?

I called out, “Oh hi.  I’m sorry, I didn’t see you there.  Were you talking to me?”  He jumped, visibly.  So . . . not talking to me then.

“Afternoon, love.  Didn’t see you there.  Just out giving the rose bushes a good talking too.  They just haven’t been trying lately, you know?  Needed a bit of a pep talk.”

Ooookaaay . . . .   “Well, that’s good then.  I hope you pull them all into line.”  I smiled, waved, and continued on down the street, and as I went I heard him resume his animated conversation with his errant roses.

By the time I reached my poor-excuse for a front garden I was already wondering when, if at all, I had ever given any of my plants ‘a good talking to’.

I myself have a ‘potted’ garden of succulents (which are, happily, extremely hard to kill) and that is enough for me.  I am very happy just to tend to my pots.  triffidI water them when they need it, pull off any dead bits, and stand them upright again if they topple over—and that’s about it.  If one of my plants puts one hairy root out of that lovingly-cared-for-pot, it’s on its own. I’m done. Once a plant makes a break for freedom into the wild ‘beyond’, I have no time for it. Now that may sound harsh, but I just don’t really trust plants at all when they start to get out and about on their own. They tend to get all a bit uppity and either turn into some huge monstrous triffid, or spread themselves liberally all about the place and get into all sorts of nooks and crannies and spots where they just aren’t welcome.

In spite of the fact that I seem to have missed out on the ‘gardening gene’, I do realise that some other people have a deep-seated, almost visceral need to get out and wallow in their gardens.  And I get that.  I really do.  I like gardens.  Other people’s gardens.  I am always very happy to sit in someone’s gorgeous garden (preferably with some lovely nibblies and glass of wine in hand) and admire their geraniums—puppy_digging_a_hole_lg_clrjust don’t ask me to help dig, prune, hoe, rake, or mulch along with you (or shout at me about the massive crater my new puppy just dug while we weren’t looking.  She really didn’t mean to dig up that gorgeous purple thing you had just managed to get established—she thought she was ‘helping’ . . . and besides, what is a garden without a couple of doggie-pot holes anyway . . . )  

And now I wonder—how many of those people who tend their gardens so passionately, also go outside and have animated conversations and ‘pep talks’ with their begonias (and do they actually listen to see if the plants answer back?)

talking_to_plantsPeople talking to their plants is not a new thing of course.  Prince Charles was widely derided after a 1986 interview where he famously said it was “very important” to talk to plants and that they “respond” when spoken to.  People aren’t laughing so much now though and it seems that ‘plant whispering’ is all the rage.  I wonder though if anyone asked P.C. after that interview— ‘What does one actually say to one’s plants?’

I assume there are rules?  Things you should and should not say to your plants?  I mean, you would presumably want to stay positive, wouldn’t you?  You know, talk about how the weather is lovely for this time of year, or that you are going out to buy them some whiz-bang new fertilizer you just came across for them to try, or ‘Perhaps you might like to be moved from here to under that lovely sunny spot over, there?’

Bee...dying(Unless of course you are sneakily using reverse psychology and surreptitiously trying to kill off everything in the rockery to make room for a new garden shed.  Then you could probably fill them in on the possible global extinction of honeybees and the devastating effect that might have on all plant life on earth.  I should think that would be enough to send even the hardiest of plants into serious decline.)

eeyore-1It does make you wonder though.  If plants can indeed hear and respond to our voices, how might it be if we could hear and respond to theirs?  What would they tell us if they could?

Maybe Eeyore has the right idea.  Maybe we should do more listening, and less talking . . .

 
6 Comments

Posted by on January 30, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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6 responses to “‘I was just sittin’ here enjoyin’ the company. Plants got a lot to say, if you take the time to listen.’ Eeyore.

  1. sallyinthehaven

    February 16, 2016 at 6:59 pm

    With a bit of luck the remaining birds will have eaten all the cockroaches. 🙂

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  2. Jon

    February 16, 2016 at 9:43 am

    oh no -might have to tell kids about the
    the birds (if any of then left as well) and the cockroaches

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  3. Jon

    February 8, 2016 at 12:53 pm

    Great piece Sal & love that it’s OK to talk to plants. But heavy metal music…? Wake them up and get them growing I suppose. Like the links you add Sally – bees one good reading but scary. We need to look after our bees -particularly our disease free ones in Australia. Seeing you too admire AE I’ll quote him back at you from the link you provided…’ Albert Einstein once prophetically remarked, “Mankind will not survive the honeybees’ disappearance for more than five years.” ‘

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    • sallyinthehaven

      February 8, 2016 at 1:48 pm

      Albert was one smart man – we should listen!! And how, in the future, will people tell their kids about ‘the birds and the bees’ if there aren’t any bees??

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  4. Steve T

    February 4, 2016 at 8:36 pm

    They like music too, apparently 🙂

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    • sallyinthehaven

      February 5, 2016 at 4:49 pm

      Mythbusters did controlled tests on the effects on plant growth when playing music to plants. The winners by far where the group of plants that got to listen to Heavy Metal! Second came those which listened to Classical Music, and last of all those that were not given any music at all. My plants will just have to suffer as I don’t have any heavy metal or classical in the house. Number One hits of the 70s might have to do them . . .

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